September 13, 2009

Sine Language – episode 119

This week, Jim Addie hits us with “War and Peace – part 2″ on the way dynamic volume adjustments are made on playback in home theatre receivers,
and Ernie asked if I could put together some thoughts on recording and processing the voice, so consider this the first part of a 2 or 3 part series on that.
Jim also provided a link to the Orban processor used for real time loudness adjustment for TV broadcast.


May 3, 2009

Sine Language – episode 111

This week, an apology to Jay for incorrectly identifying him as the author of the e-mail I read out in ep 110,
Jim Weishorn wants to discuss dynamics some more (that’ll have to wait),
a query from Steve Riekeberg at Geek Cred on the voice track processing I use in post-production (see notes at the end of this post),
Mike Wills pointed out the holophone 5.1 microphone,
a couple of people suggested the ‘limited dynamic range’ modes in home AV receivers to combat the wildly varying volume in movies,
Jim Weishorn mentioned this article on using multiple reverbs,
MMIH chimed in with some further input on movie soundtrack mixes, DVD audio, centre speakers etc, including a link to this article from Dolby on setting up home theatre,
Justin confirmed that sound travels FASTER in WARMER air,
plus I discuss the different types of reverbs (plate, spring, digital, convolution).
Oh, and the Speakerphone plugin that MMIH mentioned is made by Audioease.

And finally, those voice settings I supplied to Steve:

Reverb.

Reverb time: 800-1000ms
Initial delay: ~30ms
Diffusion: ~75%
Mix: 95% dry, 5% wet (this is the critical one… most people go overboard on the wet signal!)

Chorus.

Voices: 2
Spread: Wide
Initial delay: 15ms
Pitch: pretty close to neutral (ie don’t shift the voices up or down)


April 19, 2009

Sine Language – episode 110

In episode 110, Tim Cumings is happy with his USB mic pre-amp from Centrance,
Geoff Hankerson was concerned about the proximity of the drinks fridge to my studio, as well as being slightly miffed about the dynamic range in DVD audio when watching movies,
Justin wrote to ask about the different types of reverb and how to find the right one (something which I need to speak further on, perhaps next week),
Here’s a few links to check out:
Wiki article on the speed of sound
Wiki article on reverberation
Wiki article on acoustic absorption
and Jay wrote back about his perceptions/opinions on home theatre speakers.

m4s0n501

December 21, 2008

Sine Language – episode 104

Filed under: !Podcasts,Home theatre,Microphone,Monitoring,Sine Language,Speaker — Bruce Williams @ 14:02

In episode 104, some more from Bomar on the microphones that can hear the footsteps of an ant… or in this case, the rhythmic drumming of the legs of a spider during a mating ritual.
The university which carried out this experiment is here.
Then, I received a lengthy e-mail from Jim Addie (he of not only Moving Bits Productions fame, but also Platinum Home Theaters fame).
Jim goes into great detail on speaker choice, placement, and calibration.


December 7, 2008

Sine Language – episode 103

In ep 103, a continuation of the discussion on home theatre,
Bomar asked about why I use Lame (which I use in conjunction with Speex Multi frontend) for mp3 encoding,
plus he gave us some links for websites concerned with hearling loss:
deafness.about.com
digital recordings
University of NSW
jimmyr (link 1)
jimmyr (link 2)

and Tim Cumings was after some advice on how to mic up his computer user’s group monthly meetings.


November 23, 2008

Sine Language – episode 102

This week, Greg Anderson sent in a voice comment of his own “radio war story”,
Jim Weishorn wrote to ask for more info on subtractive eq,
Alexander Williams* (no relation) wrote to ask about processing audio for live streaming (as opposed to pre-producing content),
…which led me to again remark about having VU meters rather than just peak program meters (PPM’s), and a great free VST plugin VU meter is the Modern Meter,
and then Jim wrote again asking about home theatre… setting up speakers and subwoofers and so on.
After I finished mixing this episode, I realised I didn’t really finish answering Jim’s questions, so consider this ‘part 1 of 2′.
And talk about freaky… in the very week I talk about my Energy 10.2 subwoofer, the damn thing decided to die on me! About an hour after I recorded this ep, I realised that the sub wasn’t working. After some investigating, I came to the conclusion that it had died. I took it to 2 different stores to be checked, and they both deemed that it was dead, too. So, I’m taking it to a friend’s place today for him to have a look at it (he MIGHT be able to fix it). But if he has no luck, looks like I’ll be buying a new sub in the next week or so.

* BTW, I love Alexander’s tag line for his streaming show:

“Like a morning show. Only interesting. And at night.”


August 31, 2008

Sine Language – episode 096

This week, a further discussion on filters.
Something I should have covered last episode (but sadly neglected) was to distinguish between shelf filters and peak filters.

I also received an e-mail from Ike Tamigian, who is interested in hearing a discussion on the ins and outs of Izotope’s Ozone plugin.
I’ve put it on the list, Ike.

Then, Rob Scalise chimed in with a suggestion that I check out a podcast called the HT Guys (for Home Theatre).

Next up was Mike Wills, whose Dad has given him a cassette to convert to digital files of one description or another.
Mike wanted some tips on transferring the audio.

And finally, Greg Anderson asked why the mixes he does on the crappy little speakers in his laptop translate better to other playback systems than the mixes he does on ‘decent’ speakers.


August 17, 2008

Sine Language – episode 095

This week, so many e-mails to answer, I couldn’t get to them all!
Jim Addie chimed in with some follow up on DC offset (thanks, Jim!),
Steve Mayfield wondered if I’d got my HDMI issues sorted (Yes! Thanks, Steve).
He offered a link to another site that reviewed some hand held field recorders, registered his ‘vote of confidence’ for a video podcast for SL100, and expressed his appreciation of the new audio2u.com podcast imaging.
Then, we heard from Ike Tamigian who owns the Tascam 122L audio interface and reckons that “for the money you can’t go wrong”. Thanks Ike!
Then, Noel Payne asked about what eq filters (high pass, low pass, notch, band pass etc) to use under what circumstances. And after I finished editing the podcast, I realised there’s more I need to add to this topic, next week. Stay tuned, Noel!
And finally, Ron Eastwood wrote in with a photography analogy regarding sample rate and bit resolution, and asked what is the most important factor (with regards audio quality)?


August 3, 2008

Sine Language – episode 094

This week, an e-mail from Steve Mayfield regarding the Tascam US122L usb interface.
Quite a decent looking portable audio interface which might suit those wishing to record direct to a laptop.

* 2 XLR mic inputs with phantom power
* 2 analog line inputs (1 switchable to high impedance for use with guitars, basses, etc.)
* 1 MIDI input, 1 MIDI output
* USB 2.0 equipped (also supports USB 1.1)
* Up to 96kHz/24-bit for high quality recordings
* Zero-latency hardware monitoring
* Headphone/level control
* Bus powered for use with any PC or Mac, including laptops

Also, what’s happening with that hand-held field recorder shootout?

E. Bernhard Warg sent in another demonstation of the Coles 4104 Lip mic in action.

Plus, my dramas trying to get get a PS3, an Onkyo home theatre amp and a Sony Bravia talking and playing nicely together.
And for those interested in home theatre stuff, some reading material for ya!

HDMI and Blu-Ray

Progressive scan

Interlaced scanning

Sony Bravia XBR 40″ LCD