September 13, 2009

Sine Language – episode 119

This week, Jim Addie hits us with “War and Peace – part 2″ on the way dynamic volume adjustments are made on playback in home theatre receivers,
and Ernie asked if I could put together some thoughts on recording and processing the voice, so consider this the first part of a 2 or 3 part series on that.
Jim also provided a link to the Orban processor used for real time loudness adjustment for TV broadcast.


February 15, 2009

Sine Language – episode 105

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We’re back!
The new studio, whilst not complete, is certainly functional.
So, this ep begins with a bit of a chat regarding what the last 6-8 weeks has entailed.

Then into the meat of it:
An interview with Nick Dika (Product Manager and PR guru for Izotope) about the just released version 4 of their great mastering plugin, Ozone.
If you are interested, they have a fully-functonal 21 day trial version available for download.
Also, make sure you read the pdf on the mastering process.

Then, it’s on to some e-mail, including a lengthy one from Jim Addie about the nature of VU meters, and the benefits of having a fast-attack-fast-release compressor early in your mixdown chain….
This is rather timely, as I have recently read a piece by Mike Stavrou espousing a technique which is almost identical… and which challenges everything I have always believed (and subsequently advised my listeners) regarding dynamics.

Then another e-mail, this time from another Jim, asking about:
a. external plugin processing cards (like the TC Powercore, SSL Duende and UAD-2)
b. third octave pink noise mp3 files, and
c. audio over gigabit ethernet.

And finally, an e-mail from Ron Eastwood asking about USB turntables and cassette decks,
the legal mumbo-jumbo you hear at the end of radio commercials,
plus some tips for me on geography!


October 12, 2008

Sine Language – episode 099

This week, an answer for Bomar who thought he heard distortion in episode 98,
another mic comparison, this time between the R84 and my AKG C3000,
Jim Addie wrote in with detailed definitions of DC offset and wave asymmetry,
plus a reminder about a great thread on PSW about digital recording levels.

Also mentioned, the Shure SM81, and Rycote wind socks.


October 5, 2008

Sine Language – episode 098

This week, a ton of e-mail to answer from the last month or so,
including some reminiscing about the transition from analogue to digital within the radio industry through the late ’80′s and early ’90′s,
Ron Eastwood tried recording quasi-binaural on a boom box,
Jim Addie sent in a link to an interesting article on the merits, or lack thereof, of recording at higher sample rates and longer wordlengths (when I recorded this episode, I commented that I hadn’t read the entire article. I now have, and have the feeling that at some point in the past, I’ve been pointed to it, and have actually read it. Still, it was good to read it again!),
Greg Andreson (who is all “Bruced” out) wrote to tell me about his Zooms (the H2 and the H4!) and how much he likes them, and to comment on the wildly different standards of audio production that exist within the podcaster community,
and Pascal asked about sidechain compression.
One free VST plugin that I know of which does sidechain compression is Sidekick.
And finally, a bit of a chat about what is in store for episode 100.


August 3, 2008

Sine Language – episode 094

This week, an e-mail from Steve Mayfield regarding the Tascam US122L usb interface.
Quite a decent looking portable audio interface which might suit those wishing to record direct to a laptop.

* 2 XLR mic inputs with phantom power
* 2 analog line inputs (1 switchable to high impedance for use with guitars, basses, etc.)
* 1 MIDI input, 1 MIDI output
* USB 2.0 equipped (also supports USB 1.1)
* Up to 96kHz/24-bit for high quality recordings
* Zero-latency hardware monitoring
* Headphone/level control
* Bus powered for use with any PC or Mac, including laptops

Also, what’s happening with that hand-held field recorder shootout?

E. Bernhard Warg sent in another demonstation of the Coles 4104 Lip mic in action.

Plus, my dramas trying to get get a PS3, an Onkyo home theatre amp and a Sony Bravia talking and playing nicely together.
And for those interested in home theatre stuff, some reading material for ya!

HDMI and Blu-Ray

Progressive scan

Interlaced scanning

Sony Bravia XBR 40″ LCD


June 8, 2008

Sine Language – episode 090

This week, all those e-mails I was SUPPOSED to answer last week!
Most of which were relating to my comments about the “lip mics” that the sports broadcasters use.
Bruce McKinnon sent in this link,
Scott Hess sent in this one,
Steve Mayfield sent in 2 links… one from my former employer, plus another one,
and Chris Harris sent in this link to the Coles site.
After all of that, Tokyo Dan asked about his Audio Technica ATH-30 Com Dynamic Headset which he’s not having much luck with.
Then, there was a comment from Jim Weishorn which I felt warranted sharing with the world… ratio and difference.
Semantics? Maybe. But a good topic for discussion none the less.
And that lead on to a discussion about downward expanders.

Building the pod – episode 121

This week, my new toy (an AEA R84 ribbon mic),
my lynda.com Reason v4 title is now online,
plus a few e-mails to answer, including using Lame in Audition (thanks Steve Mayfield!),
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deleting silence,
plus a request… where am I up to?


June 1, 2008

Sine Language – episode 089

Filed under: !Podcasts,AEA,Figure 8,R84,Ribbon,Sine Language,Speaker,TRP — Bruce Williams @ 11:12

Whoops.
I had a whole bunch of e-mail I was supposed to address this week, and I completely forgot it.
And why?
Because I currently have a new toy to play with.
And in my excitement, I totally lost the plot.
So, what is it?
Well, you really should HEAR it, but if you must see it, then here ya go.
The AEA R84 ribbon mic.
OMG people!! This thing is gorgeous!
Once you’ve heard the podcast, you’ll understand why I’m telling you that I ended up adding a high shelf (about 3dB at around 3kHz) to my voice track.
I was also using the AEA TRP ribbon mic preamp.
And thank God I was!
My Focusrite VoiceMasterPro had nowhere near enough grunt to drive the R84.
The TRP offers up to 83dB of gain! That’s awesome.
And my speaking voice needed about 70dB of that gain.
But what a sound!
Anyway, enough of my raving… go listen to it for yourself.
Oh, and before you reach for the credit card… the R84 plus the TRP will set you back around US$1800!
And believe it or not, I DID actually get on to covering Noel’s question from last week about nearfield monitoring vs headphone monitoring.

Gearcast podcast feed is here, and the website is here.


July 3, 2006

Sine Language – episode 017

This week, some (rare) audio feedback, plus a discussion on microphone transduction methods, and polar responses.